Does it matter if a pepper is part green and part red?

December 30, 2017

 

 

What you see: Areas on a red, orange or yellow pepper that are still green
What it is: Just portions that are underripe, but totally edible
Eat or toss? Eat!

 

The story:

All peppers start out green and then ripen to the color their genetics intended them to be. That’s why green peppers are less sweet and cheaper than their red, orange and yellow siblings — they are harvested sooner, so there’s less investment from the farmer. They spend less time in the field and contain less sugar because they aren’t full-color ripe.

 

So, when you see a red pepper with some green on it, you’re really just seeing a pepper that’s still in the process of ripening. 

 

But here’s the rub — unlike some produce (i.e. bananas or avocados), once that pepper is harvested, ripening stops. So, unfortunately, no matter how long you wait, your partially green red pepper will never turn into a fully red pepper. And, cheapskates like me will never be able to buy the less expensive green bell peppers and leave them on the counter until they turn red. It just won’t happen. 

 

This pepper is, of course, entirely safe to eat. The green areas may not be quite as sweet as a fully red pepper, but the difference will be marginal. 


SOURCES: 
Chris Gunter - Vegetable Production Specialist for the commercial vegetable industry in North Carolina - North Carolina State University

TheKitchn. The Simple Reason Why Green Peppers Are Always Less Expensive
Waste Free Kitchen Handbook. Dana Gunders. 2015. p. 165.

 

What's red and green and pepper all over?

 

 

 

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© 2019 by Eat Or Toss.

Content may not be duplicated without express written permission from EatOrToss.com. All information posted on this blog is thoroughly researched, but is provided for reference and entertainment purposes only. For medical advice, please consult a doctor. Please see our terms